Monday, June 23, 2008

Summer diggings

The summer fieldwork season at Mt. Lykaion begins tomorrow, so that's where I'll be for the next six weeks. I'll be the (pre-)Romanist sub rosa.

The official project website:

The official project blog, which will be updated more regularly, by yours truly among others:

Saturday, June 07, 2008

Italian Round-up

Some gobbets for the skewer:

Italian police recover 3500 artifacts looted from "an Etruscan site near Rome." (IHT)

The 8th Roman Archaeology Conference, 3-5 April 2009 at the University of Michigan, will include several sessions of immediate interest to the discerning Italicist:
-The Late Republican period in "native" Southern Italy
Organizer: Fabio Colivicchi (Queen's University)
-Kings, Clans and Conflict: Italic Warfare in the first millennium BC
Organizers: Hilary Becker (Washington & Lee University) and Jeremy Armstrong (University of Auckland)
-Current Approaches to the Archaeology of first millennium BC Italian Urbanism
Organizers: Jeffrey Becker (Boston University) and Elizabeth Robinson (University of North Carolina)
-Comparative issues in the archaeology of the Roman rural landscape, site classification between survey, excavation and historical categories
Organizers: Peter A.J. Attema (University of Groningen) and G√ľnther Schoerner (Friedrich-Schiller Universit√§t, Jena)

(Session abstracts available here)

There's some novita' at the Center for Etruscan Studies' website. They're beginning to post back-issues of the journal Etruscan Studies, starting with Volume 8, 2001 (confusingly labeled 2008). Some of the links are misdirected at the moment, to the host rather than

Excavations on the site of a Late Antique villa in Spello, Umbria have uncovered a mosaic (Soprintendenza per i Beni Archeologici dell'Umbria, with photo)

Michele Stefanile reports at Archeologia Subacquea on the supposed discovery of Roman Misenum in a Google Earth satellite image, but remains skeptical. You can see the area in question also via Google Maps here. Stefanile's skepticism is well-founded; compare the rectilinear features that appear in the satellite image further east in the Bay of Naples. I bet you could find a similar pattern many other places around the world due to imaging artifacts. I suppose it's a bit like seeing Jesus in your toast.

There are some nice photos of the Terme Ruler at